Access Control Basics

As Microsoft® Provisioning Framework (MPF) processes a provisioning request, it performs the following security checks.

For access control, MPF supports scenarios such as the following.

Scenario Advantages Disadvantages
Client-side access control: A Web server or other front-end component performs all security checks before the request is submitted to MPF. MPF executes requests to external services based on the security context of a credential stored in the configuration database or (if there is no credential) MPFServiceAcct. For the latter, MPFServiceAcct must be granted access to the external services.
  • Concentrates security checking on the front end.
  • Does not require Kerberos delegation or basic authentication.
  • Loss of granularity on external access control.
  • Assumes that the client that invokes MPF is secure.
Windows® access control: MPF executes requests based on the COM security context of the calling user, using Kerberos delegation or basic authentication to impersonate that user in requests to external services. MPF does not perform security checking.
  • Authentication is done at the back end, close to the actual data.
  • Leverages Windows security context.
  • Requires either Kerberos delegation or basic authentication credentials.
  • Extra effort to set up users with security privileges for external services.
MPF access control: Provisioning servers perform security checking based on the identity's right to access:
  • Namespaces
  • A submit or submit trusted request method for IProvEngine or IProvQueue
  • Public and private procedures
  • External services (for example, before accessing Microsoft® SQL Server, a caller may have to be authorized to call Active Directory)

MPF executes requests to external services based on the security context of a credential stored in the configuration database or (if there is no credential) MPFServiceAcct. For the latter, MPFServiceAcct must be granted access to the external services.

  • Concentrates security checking in MPF.
  • Does not require Kerberos delegation.
  • Simplifies external access control.
  • Loss of granularity on external access control.
  • Assumes that MPF is secure.
See Also

Architecture